Posts Tagged ‘religion’

A man cannot compete with God

A man cannot
compete with God.
Such a pity her
neat, tall figure
was covered by
the habit of a
postulant nun.
She would come
from the small
convent next door
and sit in the same
place in the church
every morning.
That was such
a cold winter.

 

(Julian O’Dea)

Is this a real slave auction?

I put up a picture of a purported sale of a Yazidi woman recently but was told it is actually from a movie. Is this real? It looks more so.

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My wife being given away by her father, January 1986

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The Internet has a long memory

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I remember this advertisement very well. I think it appeared in a British women’s magazine in about 1970. I recall seeing it in a magazine called Nova, and I remember being rather stirred by it as a 15 year old boy.

Someone has dug it out to complain about it. As I would have predicted, the complaints focus on supposed disrespect for Islamic culture. But back in 1970, English people hardly thought about Muslims, except as the exotics portrayed above. They didn’t have to.

The above picture is fantasy and fairly harmless.

However this purports to be real and contemporary. It allegedly shows a Yazidi woman being sold as a sex slave:

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Picture shows ISIS Yazidi sex slaves sold in horrifying auctions to Saudi Arabia

Clarity on feminism from Matt Walsh

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What happens when you write a masculine poem

Two posts down is a poem I wrote a few years ago inspired (to some extent) by my marital love life. But it’s a poem. Not a non-fiction account.

I recently shared it on a Facebook poetry group on which I have shared a number of poems. I often test poems on these sites and then may go on to get them published.

This one was more controversial than most. I can see why. But I thought it was a worthwhile poem.

I got one older woman complaining that I surely wasn’t serious and it must be intended as satire. If not, it showed “worrying attitudes” or some such phrase.

When I defended the poem, a woman who had been wavering decided she liked it. Another woman also said she liked it, as did a man who said he valued the discussion.

My observation has been generally that one should never start apologising to feminists. One should stand one’s ground instead.

A poem of masculine passion should not be unacceptable. If I had written a different poem on sex from a gay or feminist perspective, there would have been no objection.

A poem describing normal, heterosexual activity in a poetic mode should be acceptable.

Ironically, the woman who complained had recently written a poem calling for more authentic voices.

Far too many poems are genteel and dull and political correctness has made the problem worse.

A controversial poem I wrote a while back

My recent comment on this poem: “There is no point in calling for an earthier, more real poetry, and then objecting when it appears. I wrote this several years ago, and it expresses my feelings at the time. It is an expression of married passion from the perspective of a man.”

The priest gave her
to me, “pretty as a picture”.
I took her home and carried her
through my front door.
I have hung her on
this nail, again and again.
I cannot decide what position
our love looks best in.

(Julian O’Dea)