Blade Runner reprised

We just saw Bladerunner 2049.

It helps obviously to have seen the first one, although the sequel makes more sense than the first film.

I think it’s a good film. But a cult film, with the usual long set pieces, some of which work, and some of which don’t.

There have been complaints about the character of Joi, the hero’s holographic girlfriend, but I got the impression that he renounced such “imaginary girlfriends” in the end.

One of the most interesting characters was a replicant (robot) villainess called Luv. By comparison, the most important female character was a little bland really.

I don’t think it was as good as the original movie, but it will, as they say, keep fans happy.

The iconic “Rachael” character makes a sort-of appearance. But not a very happy one. It’s interesting that the movie obsesses over her shiny red lipstick. Ridley Scott did too when he directed the original film. One addition to the canon is that supposedly Tyrell set up the meeting in the original movie between Deckard and Rachael precisely so that they would become a couple and have a child.

This is the recreated Rachael from the new film (it is such an irony that the original actress Sean Young is too old to play Rachael but technology has recreated her nonetheless):

Rachaelin2049.jpg

I think it could have lost at least half an hour.

I would give it at least 7 out of 10. But it’s a bleak, violent movie and that would limit its appeal.

Three more points.

There is a theme of lying and deception throughout the film. The replicants may be more compliant but they are better liars.

Luv flirts with the male replicant/robot protagonist. In some ways this is the story of Deckard and Rachael again, but entirely negative.

The theory that Deckard himself is a replicant is strengthened but I am not sure it is quite conclusive.

Luv, the stylish replicant villainess:
luv1.jpg
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luv2.jpg
Luv, as people have noted, was the most interesting new character. It’s a shame that they killed her.
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Technology to help men

makeapp.jpg

More details on this new “app” here.

As I have written before, as technology advances, it gives men new opportunities to fight back against misandrist views and behaviours. Personally, I have never been much concerned about women using makeup, but this app does demystify another female tactic.

The above supposed tweet from Ana Kasparian is probably not real. However, it makes the point.

Commentary:

‘Problematic’ Makeup Removing App ‘MakeApp’ Causes Mass Triggering

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This was my wife when we were young. After a swim. I think she looked good without makeup. (I assume that’s my thumb on the left!)

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kodswim

Here she is with makeup:

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Here is a good example of makeup off and on:

makeuponoff.jpg

[Katherine Ross Ridenhour was arrested Wednesday for allegedly having an inappropriate relationship with a male student.  (Concord Police Department/Facebook)]

“Interesting assumption”

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Ex-Gay writer on films that valourise female virginity

 

Where the Boys Are: A Reevaluation

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As I have written before, the main (negative) achievement of the feminist revolution was to make men feel they could no longer have a reasonable expectation of marrying a virgin.

As I have also written before, one of the very few films to consider a woman’s virginity as significant, in recent years, was Metropolitan (1980), with the beloved character of Audrey Rouget. I have written about that movie extensively at this blog.

Oh, sweet lady

Oh, sweet lady serving 
at the chemist’s,
with your modest cleavage
and your voice like a little bird –
definitely, in a second life,
or a third.

Julian O’Dea

Paula Wright, independent anti-feminist evolutionary thinker

https://porlawright.com/

This includes several interesting essays including some thoughts on benign patriarchy. I believe we currently have a benign patriarchy in the West, which should be conserved.

A woman’s literary effort

 

“Few authors write better or more believable tales of domestic discipline than CJ Blais, and she’s at the top of her literary form with “Plain and Simple,” a collection of stories featuring…”