A pretty girl sings a “blue pill” song

 

Mary Black in her prime, singing a song from a man’s perspective. The poor fellow is clearly in need of the “red pill”. Or as they used to say, “faint heart never won fair lady.”

I went to church on Sunday
My love, she passed me by
I knew her mind was changing
By the roving of her eye
By the roving of her eye
By the roving of her eye
I knew her mind was changing
By the roving of her eye

My love’s fair and proper
Her waist is neat and small
She is quite good-looking
And that’ s the best of all
And that’ s the best of all
And that’ s the best of all
And she is quite good-looking
And that’ s the best of all

Oh, Hannah, loving Hannah
Come give to me your hand
You said that if you’re married
That i will be the one
That i will be the one
That i will be the one
You said that if you’re married
That i will be the one

I will go down by the river
When everyone’s asleep
I’ll think of loving Hannah
And then sit down and grieve
And then sit down and grieve
And then sit down and grieve
I’ll think of loving Hannah
And then sit down and grieve

I went to church on Sunday
My love she passed me by
I knew her mind was changing
By the roving of her eye
By the roving of her eye
By the roving of her eye
I knew her mind was changing
By the roving of her eye

Songwriters: SIMPSON, CHRISTOPHER JOHN / MORTER, DOUGLAS WILLIAM / TRADITIONAL.
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13 responses to this post.

  1. Posted by Ofelas on April 2, 2017 at 6:23 pm

    This somehow reminds me now of some songs by Jonathan Richman and the Modern lovers: I used to really love the band and still in a way consider them one of the great ones, but after undergoing some red pill therapy, so to speak, some of the songs really make me cringe and can hardly stomach them anymore…

    Reply

    • Posted by Julian O'Dea on April 3, 2017 at 10:29 am

      Yes. It’s tiresome. He seems to be over-analysing, which is fatal in affairs of the heart I feel.

      Reply

  2. Posted by Ofelas on April 2, 2017 at 6:27 pm

    This one is much better, but still..

    Reply

    • Posted by Julian O'Dea on April 2, 2017 at 6:59 pm

      A lady blogger, Ame, wrote something recently about the way in which songwriters skew their lyrics towards women’s perspectives.

      I too have noticed the paucity of popular songs with masculine themes. Rap artists. The Rolling Stones. Some of David Bowie. Some of Dylan. Maybe Bryan Ferry. But apart from them, there is an awful lot of rather effeminate material.

      Reply

    • Posted by Julian O'Dea on April 3, 2017 at 10:33 am

      As a few people have pointed out, if you are a high-status male (like a recording artist), you can sing sappy songs and girls won’t mind. But actually carrying on like these songs indicate, for an ordinary man, is not going to impress many women.

      I suspect too that, a few decades ago, when men’s status compared with women was higher, men could afford to be a bit more sentimental and gentlemanly.

      Reply

  3. Posted by Ofelas on April 2, 2017 at 7:47 pm

    Right.., and when we consider that a pop song (due to its structure and nature – melody, repetitive rhythmic patterns, rhyming, easy to remember slogans, that are not filtered through rational analysis, but often remembered by heart without even thinking about the content too much) is actually an ideal vehicle to get both subliminal and overt messages through, without the recipient even noticing he is being brainwashed, it is really scary, what power the music industry or authors of the songs actually have.

    Thank you for pointing me to your article and the other blogger’s one, I will check them.

    For me personally an epitome of a masculine band, and to be honest I don’t know why, but intuitively I sense it there somehow (the honor, the pride, then on the other hand facing and dealing with devastating failure, the ‘tribal’ unity, the will to fight even for lost cause because it is the right thing to do, family bonds, loyalty, death, all these topics.. ) are New model army. Songs like ‘The hunt’, or ‘Liberal education’, ‘My people’, ‘Believe it’ come to mind now..

    P. S. And one more really disgustingly blue pill song I remembered now: Townes Van Zandt (who is otherwise absolutely brilliant) – “Second lover’s song” Ouch..

    Reply

  4. “The Twa Magicians” – here performed by Steeleye Span – has lyrics that would horrify any modern feminist inclined to read lyrics for their moral lessons: it’s a song more or less about a mythical pursuit and seduction against the lady’s wishes. Quite beautiful. But then again it’s often a bit silly to read lyrics for their moral lessons.

    Reply

    • Posted by Ofelas on April 3, 2017 at 9:26 am

      Somehow brought to mind this one – recording from the period prior to Terry Woods from Steeleye Span joined the Pogues.

      “..If anyone comes a courting you,
      you can say you’re a country lass.
      You don’t have to tell them,
      that you ever played this joke.
      That you got drilled in a sentry box
      wrapped up in a soldier’s cloke..”

      AF-BB.

      Reply

      • Posted by Julian O'Dea on April 3, 2017 at 10:59 am

        Yes. The licentious soldier and the simple maid is a bit of a theme. It probably happened in real life fairly often. Here is a similar song:

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