A traditional girl reacts to the “pussy” marchers

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Alice meets the talking vaginas.

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15 responses to this post.

  1. Posted by Craig on January 26, 2017 at 3:38 pm

    Nice Cheshire cat reference. Love that story, bro. Was two stories right? Alice in Wonderland and Alice and the Jaberwocky?

    Reply

    • Posted by Julian O'Dea on January 26, 2017 at 3:42 pm

      Alice in Wonderland. Alice Through the Lookinglass.

      That picture is not of the Cheshire cat.

      I just thought the faces appearing in the centre of the flowers at the bottom of the picture were a bit like the women who marched recently dressed up as vulvas and vaginas.

      Reply

  2. Posted by Craig on January 26, 2017 at 5:30 pm

    I’ll admit I only glanced at the picture. I see the faces in the flowers now. Yeah, they look like the vagina heads.

    Reply

  3. Flowers in general are very like sex organs. Which of course is the point!

    Reply

    • Posted by Julian O'Dea on January 27, 2017 at 1:02 am

      Do you mean that Lewis Carroll had that in mind?

      Reply

      • I suppose that’s possibly what the illustrator (not Tenniel?) had in mind. But I don’t think Carroll or his artist would really have thought this appropriate for what they would have wanted to be innocent nonsense. But we all know the symbolism of flowers and their ancient attachment to romance, and knowledge of their sexual function must have been widespread by then. So the interpretation must have been possible.

      • Posted by Julian O'Dea on January 29, 2017 at 6:01 am

        The image comes up on Google search as “Tiger Lily” by John Tenniel.

  4. Have I mentioned here Erasmus Darwin’s poetic-botanical treatises, ‘The Botanic Garden’ and ‘Zoonomia’? Full of details about the sex lives of different plants, and possibly serving as something of a justification for the kind of free love Raz wanted in human society (if sex can have such varied forms in the plant world, why not in the human world, too?)

    Reply

    • Posted by Julian O'Dea on January 29, 2017 at 4:58 am

      Yes. I think I read that it was regarded as a bit shocking. Perhaps in a book I have on the Lunar Society, of which Erasmus Darwin was a member.

      I think he was a doctor. Charles had a wealthy family background. Perhaps Erasmus helped found the family’s fortunes.

      They were a clever family. One of Charles’ descendants was a top physicist. So they had a variety of talents. Although I don’t think Erasmus’ poetry was good as poetry.

      Reply

      • I think they both sponged off their Wedgwood ancestors… 🙂

      • Posted by Julian O'Dea on January 29, 2017 at 6:05 am

        Yes. I think that is quite possible. And Wedgwood was also in the Lunar Society I think.

        And the Huxleys, as they came up in the world, married into the Arnold family. Julian and Aldous were products of that union.

        It was visiting American, JD Watson, who remarked in The Double Helix that all the important people in England are related.

      • That’s a good line. Reading the Spectator I often get the impression of a big cosy if sometimes squabbling family. (That magazine itself is shamelessly nepotistic in its employment practices). They once published a big visual map of literary relationships in England around 1900 – you could see who was married to who while sleeping with who, who their mummy and daddy was, who was in parliament when they met who… etc. Lots of interrelating going on…

      • Posted by Julian O'Dea on January 29, 2017 at 2:58 pm

        Watson was probably thinking mostly of the scientific world. But even there the connections are extraordinary. I was just reading up on the Huxleys and I noticed that Julian and Aldous had a half-brother Andrew. It so happens that he was a Nobel laureate in Physiology and Medicine.

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