Dreams coming true

Soren Kierkegaard:

” Oh, can I really believe the poet’s tales, that when one first sees the object of one’s love, one imagines one has seen her long ago, that all love like all knowledge is remembrance, that love too has its prophecies in the individual … ? “

Sometimes in life, dreams do come true. Daydreaming has the practical value that it helps us to clarify and give some kind of shape to our plans. In my now lengthy experience, I have found that some dreams do indeed come true, eventually. Others do not. But, most disconcertingly, sometimes we have an unexpected success, something we never dreamed of.

I say that unexpected success can be disconcerting because without the preparation that dreaming gives us, we may not know what to do with it. It may seem totally unfamiliar. We have never prepared for it mentally. And we don’t have the scenarios worked out.

It is possible, oddly, to discover that we have a talent we never expected. It seems strange, like suddenly being able to reach into a pocket and pull out hundred dollar notes. It feels freakish and unnatural. We have never dreamed of it.

As for dreams that come true, many men must feel like Kierkegaard that a girl is “the girl of their dreams”. Or to use CS Lewis’ phrase, their “terrestrial Venus”. Perhaps it is only biology talking, but most men have an imagined female that they semi-consciously pursue all their lives.

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3 responses to this post.

  1. Posted by Craig on September 30, 2016 at 9:32 pm

    “…when one first sees the object of one’s love, one imagines one has seen her long ago, that all love like all knowledge is remembrance, that love too has its prophecies in the individual … ? “
    More often than not, such love is the delusions of a false prophet.

    Reply

  2. Posted by Glengarry on October 7, 2016 at 3:11 pm

    One such dangerous situation is to come into a large sum of money, like an unexpected inheritance or winning the proverbial lottery. Very easy to lose it all if you haven’t day dreamed a bit and are unprepared.

    Regarding one’s loves, I’ve had the fortune or fate to re-encounter a number of university paramours in later years, some of which I was quite attached to. Alas, time and gravity are very cruel to women. (Not that many of them don’t deserve it.) I’m hardly Kierkegaard in my observations, but seeing them again and remembering what was, is disconcerting.

    Reply

    • Posted by Julian O'Dea on October 8, 2016 at 1:46 am

      Yes, I suppose it is commoner to daydream winning a lot of money but not precisely how one would use or invest it.

      Kierkegaard’s own lovelife was not much of a model. I think he should have married Regine Olsen instead of writing about her.

      Reply

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